How is EASA Part 66 License obtained?

EASA is the regulatory authority of the European Union and is responsible for issuing guidelines associated with airworthiness and air safety.
It is a common perception that the EASA Part 66 License is issued by EASA

  • EASA is the regulatory authority of the European Union and is responsible for issuing guidelines associated with airworthiness and air safety.
  • It is a common perception that the EASA Part 66 License is issued by EASA but in real-time it is the National Aviation Authority (NAA) of the EU member state which grants an Aircraft Maintenance License (AML).
  • In order to make one eligible for getting EASA Part 66 License, there are two separate ways.

easa-aml

1.By Completing Organised Training

Organised training means attending 2400 hrs. of theoretical & practical elements of all the modules (with minimum 90% attendance) relevant to the particular category of training, which are covered in an EASA approved Part 147 Maintenance Training Organisation. These same EASA Part 147 organisations are responsible for the conduct of Part 66 module examination and issue Certificate of Recognition (C Of R) upon successful passing of examinations.

Another requirement associated with the grant of EASA Part 147 AML (Aircraft Maintenance License) is two years of Practical Maintenance Experience in a Part 145 MRO (Maintenance Repair Overhaul Organisation). The details of all the tasks covered in an MRO should be entered in a Maintenance logbook which is duly verified by the Certifying staff of the MRO.

After successful passing of all the modules and two years of practical experience, the documents (Module examinations “Certificate of Recognition” and “Aircraft Maintenance Logbook” containing details of tasks performed) are submitted to the National Aviation Authority (NAA) of the European Union member state for the validation and acceptance. The authority after verification of the submitted documents issues EASA Part 66 License to the applicant.

2.By Direct Entry in the Maintenance Division

This process is a straight way which does not include any theoretical elements coverage but an aspirant has to completely rely on practical training for the skills & knowledge development. The experience requirement for the fulfilment of minimum task coverage for the accomplishment of regulatory compliance is much high and may exceed a minimum of five years. The passing of all the module examinations pertaining to the relevant category of training is mandatory and the aspirant has to clear all the module examinations to get the Certificate of Recognition (C Of R) for the passing modules. This step is very difficult as clearing the exam without organised training becomes very difficult. The time which an aspirant has to devote towards gaining the experience requirement is too large and is also a hindrance in fulfilment of procedures required for the grant of EASA Part 147 Aircraft Maintenance License (AML) by Competent Authority.

The Aircraft Maintenance Logbook contains the list of tasks performed by the aspirant during his tenure as a mechanic/technician and his cross verified by the Certifying staff of the Part 145 organisation for its authentication.

In a similar way, an aspirant has to submit his documents

Certificate Of Recognition (C of R & Logbook of Practical Maintenance Experience ) to the National Aviation Authority (NAA) upon the acceptance of which a Blank Aircraft Maintenance License (Part 66) is issued to the aspirant without Type Rating.

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